Videas, audias, socius.

The good stuff. (Definitely needs a sub, though.)
Ball and Buck + SOTA turntable, $998, and Ball and Buck + Blumenstein “Orca” speakers, $695 for two, 144B Newbury St., Boston, 617-262-1776, ballandbuck.com
Boston Magazine:
» When Mark Bollman decided to commission a custom sound system for his Newbury Street store, Ball and Buck, he had one very important request: that the equipment be finished in rich wood. “It goes along with that whole philosophy around vinyl music and the warm, true sound of the original composition,” Bollman explains. “It’s a natural sound, so it’s a natural finish on the product.” Working with the American audio companies SOTA and Blumenstein, Bollman dreamed up a turntable and speakers that met those specifications. «

The good stuff. (Definitely needs a sub, though.)

Ball and Buck + SOTA turntable, $998, and Ball and Buck + Blumenstein “Orca” speakers, $695 for two, 144B Newbury St., Boston, 617-262-1776, ballandbuck.com

Boston Magazine:

» When Mark Bollman decided to commission a custom sound system for his Newbury Street store, Ball and Buck, he had one very important request: that the equipment be finished in rich wood. “It goes along with that whole philosophy around vinyl music and the warm, true sound of the original composition,” Bollman explains. “It’s a natural sound, so it’s a natural finish on the product.” Working with the American audio companies SOTA and Blumenstein, Bollman dreamed up a turntable and speakers that met those specifications. «

(Source: airows, via paolama)

4,776 notes

Photo by Jeri Koegel

Photo by Jeri Koegel

(Source: aworldofdreamhomes)

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Hans Silvester — from the series Natural Fashion, 2006-7

Hans Silvester — from the series Natural Fashion, 2006-7

(Source: likeafieldmouse, via fototropes)

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comicsalliance:

GEOFF JOHNS SAYS DC ENTERTAINMENT’S TV AND MOVIE UNIVERSES ARE SEPARATE
By Matt D. Wilson
If you were hoping to see Arrow‘s Stephen Amell make an appearance as the emerald archer in Batman V Superman: Dawn of Justice or in the upcoming Justice League movie, DC Comics Chief Creative Officer Geoff Johns has some bad news for you.
“We will not be integrating the film and television universes,” he said at the Television Critics Association press tour for The Flash. Seems pretty cut and dried.
READ MORE

comicsalliance:

GEOFF JOHNS SAYS DC ENTERTAINMENT’S TV AND MOVIE UNIVERSES ARE SEPARATE

By Matt D. Wilson

If you were hoping to see Arrow‘s Stephen Amell make an appearance as the emerald archer in Batman V Superman: Dawn of Justice or in the upcoming Justice League movie, DC Comics Chief Creative Officer Geoff Johns has some bad news for you.

“We will not be integrating the film and television universes,” he said at the Television Critics Association press tour for The Flash. Seems pretty cut and dried.

READ MORE

156 notes

pbsthisdayinhistory:

July 9, 1868: The 14th Amendment is Adopted 
On this day in 1868, the 14th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution was ratified.  It extended citizenship and its benefits to “all persons born or naturalized in the United States,” regardless of their race or gender, although it took nearly 100 years for this principle to be enforced.
Learn more about the 14th Amendment with Constitution USA with Peter Sagal.

pbsthisdayinhistory:

July 9, 1868: The 14th Amendment is Adopted

On this day in 1868, the 14th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution was ratified.  It extended citizenship and its benefits to “all persons born or naturalized in the United States,” regardless of their race or gender, although it took nearly 100 years for this principle to be enforced.

Learn more about the 14th Amendment with Constitution USA with Peter Sagal.

465 notes

Seems we haven’t come far, Mr. Scopes.
pbsthisdayinhistory:

July 21, 1925: Scopes Found Guilty in “Monkey Trial”
On this day in 1925, a Tennessee high school science teacher, John Thomas Scopes, was found guilty of teaching evolution, which violated Tennessee state law. The Scopes Trial, known as the “Monkey Trial,” lasted only a week, but ignited conversation and debate over whether to teach Creation or Evolution in the classroom. 
The court acquitted Scopes on a technicality but upheld the constitutionality of the state law which was eventually overturned in 1967.
Explore American Experience’s timeline of the Scopes “Monkey” Trial to learn more.
Image:  John Thomas Scopes, Library of Congress.

Seems we haven’t come far, Mr. Scopes.

pbsthisdayinhistory:

July 21, 1925: Scopes Found Guilty in “Monkey Trial”

On this day in 1925, a Tennessee high school science teacher, John Thomas Scopes, was found guilty of teaching evolution, which violated Tennessee state law. The Scopes Trial, known as the “Monkey Trial,” lasted only a week, but ignited conversation and debate over whether to teach Creation or Evolution in the classroom.

The court acquitted Scopes on a technicality but upheld the constitutionality of the state law which was eventually overturned in 1967.

Explore American Experience’s timeline of the Scopes “Monkey” Trial to learn more.

Image:  John Thomas Scopes, Library of Congress.

572 notes

Perfect summer blues by Spencer Finch

Perfect summer blues by Spencer Finch

(Source: wgsn)

3,177 notes

ransomcenter:

Norman Bel Geddes fans: The exhibition “I Have Seen the Future: Norman Bel Geddes Designs America”is on view at the Wolfsonian through September 28.  

From the Wolfsonian:
"Norman Bel Geddes (1893–1958) was an industrial and theatrical designer who gained fame in the 1920s, ’30s, and ’40s for his streamlined and futuristic innovations. His designs played a significant role in shaping America’s image as an innovative powerhouse and global leader into the future. One of his most famous undertakings was the unforgettable Futurama exhibition at the 1939–1940 New York World’s Fair."

ransomcenter:

Norman Bel Geddes fans: The exhibition “I Have Seen the Future: Norman Bel Geddes Designs America”is on view at the Wolfsonian through September 28.  

From the Wolfsonian:

"Norman Bel Geddes (1893–1958) was an industrial and theatrical designer who gained fame in the 1920s, ’30s, and ’40s for his streamlined and futuristic innovations. His designs played a significant role in shaping America’s image as an innovative powerhouse and global leader into the future. One of his most famous undertakings was the unforgettable Futurama exhibition at the 1939–1940 New York World’s Fair."

1,001 notes

(source: DoghouseDiaries)

(source: DoghouseDiaries)

(via nevver)

2,129 notes

thinksquad:

Laws that criminalize homelessness are on the rise across the country, according to a new report by an advocacy group. The laws prohibit everything from sleeping in public to loitering and begging. Advocates for the homeless say the laws are making the problem worse.

Susan St. Amour is among those who could be affected by the new restrictions. Twice a week, she stands on a median strip at an intersection in downtown Portland, Maine, asking passersby for cash. She says she needs the money to get by.

"[If] for some reason I don’t get a bed at the shelter and I have nowhere to stay, it means I can’t eat that night unless I have a few dollars in my pocket," she says. "Or it may be because I need to take the bus to the other side of town. I might have a doctor’s appointment."

Last year, though, the city passed a law that banned loitering on median strips. A federal judge has since declared the law unconstitutional, but the city plans to appeal. Council member Ed Suslovic says the goal of the legislation was not to hurt the homeless — just the opposite, in fact.

"This was a public safety threat, mainly to the folks in the median strip, but also to motorists going by as well," Suslovic says.

To Maria Foscarinis, executive director of the National Law Center on Homelessness and Poverty, such measures are counterproductive — as well-meaning as they might be. Especially if they subject individuals to jail time or fines they can’t afford to pay.

"It’s really hard to get a job when you’re homeless anyway, or to get housing," Foscarinis says. "You have no place to bathe, no place to dress, no money for transportation. But then, if you also have an arrest record, it’s even more challenging."

Still, her group says such laws are on the rise. The National Law Center found that local bans on sleeping in vehicles have increased almost 120 percent over the past three years. Citywide bans on camping have grown 60 percent, and laws against begging have increased 25 percent. This all comes at a time when the U.S. government estimates that more than 610,000 people are homeless on any given night.

http://www.npr.org/2014/07/16/332050463/with-a-series-of-small-bans-cities-turn-homelessness-into-a-crime

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